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Pope Francis Clarifies Earlier Remarks About Gay People

by Queerty News January 12, 2016

Pope Francis Clarifies Earlier Remarks About Gay People

 

 

Pope Francis is expanding on his 2013 remarks about gays.

In an interview with Italian journalist Andrea Tornielli, Pope Francis is asked how he might act as a confessor to a gay person just a few years after his “who am I to judge?” remarks made many hopeful that the Vatican is heading toward a softer stance on gays.

The reply appears in a new book called The Name of God is Mercy and, well, read for yourself:

“On that occasion I said this: If a person is gay and seeks out the Lord and is willing, who am I to judge that person? I was paraphrasing by heart the Catechism of the Catholic Church where it says that these people should be treated with delicacy and not be marginalized.”

“I am glad that we are talking about ‘homosexual people’ because before all else comes the individual person, in his wholeness and dignity, and people should not be defined only by their sexual tendencies: let us not forget that God loves all his creatures and we are destined to receive his infinite love.”

“I prefer that homosexuals come to confession, that they stay close to the Lord, and that we pray all together. You can advise them to pray, show goodwill, show them the way, and accompany them along it.”

We’re not Catholics, but it all sounds very similar to the “love the sinner, hate the sin” nonsense we’ve heard from evangelical Christians for years.

For every step forward like his original remarks, there is another step back, like his meeting with Kim Davis. Then again, he did meet with a gay couple the day before, but we’re sick of how ambiguous it all remains.

We’ll leave it to the Catholics among Queerty readers to discuss and analyze, but we’re gonna keep on loving ourselves regardless of what anyone says.




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