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Part Daddy, Part Engineer

by Jason Holling April 14, 2014

Baby - Some assembly required.

Jason Holling talks about his adventure assembling the nursery furniture.

Justin and I started our journey for adoption a little over a year ago. We have talked about what a roller coaster the journey has been. We have had hurdles with agencies accepting us as an LGBT couple even though we have been together over 10 years.   We have had people call and scam us about being a birthmother and then not even being pregnant.  But we hit the greatest obstacle on our journey yet…. the words “some assembly required”.

We bought several items to put in the nursery such as a toy chest, Pack and Play, and a baby sleeper.   Thinking it was a rainy Sunday and we would assemble them for something fun to do together, we dumped boxes of parts out on the floor.   Hours later, and I emphasize hours, we have a toy chest assembled with the drawers in backwards!  We held out the instructions that have no words, just drawings of screws and wooden pegs with an arrow pointing to another piece.  I think Justin even said at one point “are you sure we are reading this right side up?”.

Now keep in mind we are both smart people.  I have an engineering degree and should be able to figure this thing out in a heartbeat.    But we sat there in our pile of screws, pegs, side A’s, and front panel’s for hours putting together these simple pieces.  It got me chuckling that in order to be a parent you really need to be part daddy and part engineer to figure out how to assemble the nursery.

One of the best things we did when we bought the crib last summer was paid the deliverymen to assemble it.   For $20 they would deliver and assemble it.  Money well spent in my eyes.  Justin probably agrees, because I am sure we would be divorced if we had to put that together ourselves.   Or we would have 5 screws left worried if our crib would fall over!

Just wait until years from now when our child is waiting for Christmas or their birthday.  The daddy engineers will be in the family room assembling their toys.    I know the “some assembly required” is going to get more complicated with a kid hovering over us waiting for the toy to be done – and it will be worth every moment of agony assembling when we see the joy in our child’s eyes playing with the toy.  Tonight the hopeful dads and part engineers sit together in the nursery dreaming.  We are blessed and hopeful of things to come.   Keep us in your thoughts this month.

Read more about Jason and Justin’s journey to become parents on

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Jason Holling
Jason Holling


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