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How Involved Should I Get In My Child’s School

by The Next Family September 24, 2013

By Joe Newman

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What do you say to a parent who asks, “How involved should I get in school?”

Before talking about this question I first want to talk about a more important underlying issue.  Relations between parents and teachers are at an all-time low.  Parents blame teachers for their child’s poor academic performance and teachers blame parents for raising badly behaved children.  And while there are certainly parents and teachers who are not like this, it is the unfortunate trend.

So before a parent can know how involved they should get in their child’s school, or what kind of involvement will be optimal, they must first build a positive and productive relationship with their child’s teacher.

First, what to do.

Assume the teacher wants the very best for your child, even if you don’t see it. Remember the saying; first seek to understand, then to be understood.  Find out what the teacher is doing, what they see happening with your child in the classroom, what their concerns are, what their struggles in the classroom are, and how you might be able to mitigate any of these.

Ask them directly, “What can I do to support your work with my child?”  Then do your best to do it.

Stay informed about what your child is doing in class and what they have for homework.  Make sure they’re doing their homework and confirm that they’re turning it in.  Set up an effective homework routine -you can find help on Homework Tips.

If you offer suggestions, offer them in the form of questions like, “Is it possible for Rachael to use manipulatives when she does her Math work?  This seemed really helpful for her last year.”  Or, “Are there opportunities for Dylan to have chores in the classroom?  He seems to get into less mischief when he’s given responsibilities.”

Catch them being good.  We love to use this with our child but it’s an equally effective tool to build a relationship with our child’s teacher.  Find something, or several things, that you like about what’s happening in your child’s classroom and let them know you see it and appreciate it.

Second, what not to do.

Don’t attempt to correct or criticize a teacher until you have established a positive relationship with them.  Even well intentioned advice can fall on deaf ears if you don’t understand what’s happening in the classroom.

When parents attempt to correct or criticize a teacher’s approach or method with their child it almost always goes badly.  A teacher may listen politely during the conference and say they will consider, or even try, the suggestion.  But when the conference is over, the chance that the teacher will actually implement the suggested change is slim.  And worse the parent/teacher relationship will be worse for the experience.  Why?  Because in most cases the teacher has either tried this suggestion before, knows it can’t be realistically implemented, or disagrees with the approach altogether.  In other words, the parent didn’t understand before they sought to be understood.

Eight years ago, when I finished my Master’s degree, the agency I worked for immediately made me a supervisor.  After twelve years being the child whisperer who could turn around the most difficult children, I now had the opportunity to oversee and train twenty behavior specialists and teachers and pass on all that I knew.  To my great surprise very few of these people seemed interested.  After six exhausting months with only a little progress I finally realized that I needed to build relationships first, then teach.  I had to appreciate the efforts and the insights of the people I wanted to teach before they would hear anything I had to say.  I needed to understand before trying to be understood.

Once I began focusing on recognizing, appreciating, and articulating the efforts and insights of those around me all my cases started to quickly improve.  When what people think and feel when you walk into the room shifts from, “There’s the guy who always tells me what I’m doing wrong” to “There’s the guy who really understands how hard I’m trying” amazing things start to happen.

It didn’t matter that I knew the right thing to do to turn these kids around (I did), what mattered was actually getting it done.  And to actually do it required appreciating and developing positive relationships with the people who would be doing most of the work.

Studies consistently show that children whose parents are involved with their schoolwork do much better than children whose parents aren’t.  Just remember that how you get involved is just as important as how much.  Assume your child’s teacher wants the best for your child.  Make efforts to support them.  Ask questions about what’s happening and how best to support.  Recognize the efforts of teachers and appreciate them.  Then, get involved in school as much as you are able and in the ways that are in unity with the needs of your child’s teachers.

 

Joe Newman is a Behavior Consultant and the author of Raising Lions.  Follow us on Instagram for Parenting Tip Tuesday and share some of your own tips with us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram. #parentingtiptuesday

The post How Involved Should I Get In My Child’s School appeared first on The Next Family.




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