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by The Next Family November 11, 2010

By: Kacie Bernstein

We searched for months to find the perfect crib. My husband thought I was crazy, but cribs seemed like a big deal. When the babies were born, we kept them in one pack n’ play for about six weeks, and then moved them to their gorgeous, solid wood, espresso cribs. Bumper or no bumper?…we went back and forth, but decided to keep them on. Next was the blanket; we gave them that around six months. Then the dropping of the crib –my babies were getting bigger and it was definitely bittersweet.

It was a normal Saturday morning and we put our 16-month-old twins down for their 9:00 nap, but Zach was screaming; apparently he didn’t need the nap as much as we did. After about 15 minutes I decided to take him out to try again later, but somehow he got to me first! Yes…my 16-month-old son climbed out of his crib! I screamed for my husband, WTF?…how could this be happening already? I immediately called our pediatrician and both of our moms. Before any advice was given there was a lot of shock and laughter. What in the world were we going to do?

My dad suggested that we turn the crib around since the back was significantly higher. That provided us with a huge sense of relief –how could he ever get out now? We did, however, go to Juvenile Shop that afternoon to purchase two toddler beds. We wanted to be prepared this time, and the beds wouldn’t arrive for a few weeks anyway. Life was simple again…at least, until the following Saturday, when he got out AGAIN! The beds hadn’t arrived yet, and their room wasn’t safe enough for them to potentially roam free in the middle of the night. My husband devised a barrier on the crib with pillows and the changing table pad, which worked for a few days.

Eight days later we got the call that the beds were ready. The babies went to the park in the morning, and when they came back for their nap, the cribs were gone and their new beds were set up.
My husband and I went back and forth about whether or not our daughter should be permitted to stay in her crib; after all, she wasn’t climbing out. I treat both of my children as individuals, but it is much easier to tackle milestones and transitions at the same time. We were so concerned about how they would react about losing their cribs at 16 ½ months! Surprisingly, the transition was very smooth. Naptime was a little difficult for the first few days, but that was it. They don’t always sleep in their beds – we occasionally find them in one bed together or on the floor –but at least they are sleeping and safe!

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