This could be why you’re not seeing results from your workouts

Jeff Taylor

Wondering why your exercise regiment isn’t bringing the desired results? A recent study might have the answer why, and the solution that could help you lose weight, gain muscle and become healthier.

Researchers from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, and the University of Ottawa tracked 21 healthy women and men as they completed two types of workouts during two separate training periods, with a gap in between that lasted several months.

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They published the results in the journal PLOS ONE, concluding that switching from one type of workout to another could provide results.

Participants engaged in both endurance training and interval training, and researchers found that some responded better to one over the other. Endurance training involves long periods of repetitive action, as opposed to the burst and recover intensity training.

“What our study shows is that if you’re doing one type of exercise and you’re not getting the optimal result, you can switch to a different stimulus and that may help you,” says co-author Brendon Gurd, PhD, associate professor of muscle physiology at Queens University School of Kinesiology and Health Studies.

Endurance training consisted of riding a stationary bike for 30 minutes at a moderate level of exertion, and interval training consisted of 20-second sprints on the bike, with ten seconds of rest between each sprint.

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Participants’ heart rates, VO2 max, and other measures of cardiovascular health and fitness were tested.

“What our study shows is that if you’re doing one type of exercise and you’re not getting the optimal result, you can switch to a different stimulus and that may help you,” says co-author Brendon Gurd, PhD, associate professor of muscle physiology at Queens University School of Kinesiology and Health Studies.

Gurd suggests those on a workout regiment wishing to test its success should measure their heartrate after walking or running on a treadmill at a set pace and incline, and for a set amount of time. One should also clock how long it takes them to run a set distance.

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If after several weeks of performing those tests while doing your current regiment you see no drop in heartrate and are unable to run faster, that is a solid sign that it is time to switch it up and try something new.

While 21 people is admittedly a small sample size, hopefully more research can be done in this area. After all, all the exercise in the world means little if your body is not responding.

h/t Motto

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